Securities Law & Instruments


In the Matter of Staff’s Recommendation
to Suspend the Registrations of
Smart Investments Ltd. and David Hopps

Opportunity to be Heard by the Director
under Section 31 of the Securities Act (Ontario



Decision

1. For the reasons outlined below, my decision is to accept the recommendation of Staff to suspend the registrations of Smart Investment Ltd. in all categories, effective 70 calendar days from the date of this decision. This decision is deferred so that the Smart mutual funds can initiate the winding-up process and the managed account clients have time to hire a new portfolio manager. During this 70 calendar day period, Smart shall not accept new unitholders or additional assets from current unitholders in the mutual funds or open managed accounts for new or existing clients or accept additional assets from clients. Redemption requests from the unitholders shall be managed through the winding-up process.

2. For the interests of unitholders, managed account clients and the public interest, Hopps was permitted, without prejudice, to surrender his registration as ultimate designated person (UDP), after the registration application for a new UDP was approved.

Background

3. By letter dated December 9, 2015 and amended on March 21, 2016, staff (Staff) of the Ontario Securities Commission (Commission) advised David Hopps (Hopps), the UDP of Smart Investments Ltd. (Smart), that they were recommending to the Director that the registrations of Smart as an investment fund manager, an adviser in the category of portfolio manager and a dealer in the category of exempt market dealer, and the registration of Hopps as the UDP of Smart be suspended. Also, Staff recommended that the Director refuse the application for Samantha Pinto (Pinto) to be registered as the chief compliance officer (CCO) of Smart. Pinto did not attend the meetings with the Director during this Opportunity to be Heard (OTBH).

4. Smart (formerly known as Kingship Capital Corporation (KCC)) is the discretionary portfolio manager for six prospectus-qualified mutual funds, which are passive index funds, and approximately twelve discretionary managed accounts. As of March 10, 2016, Smart had approximately $22 million in assets under management.

5. In a Commission order dated July 16, 2014 (the Commission Order){1}, Smart and 2389401 Ontario Inc. (238 Inc.), of which Hopps is the sole shareholder, received approval to acquire all of the interests of Pro-Financial Asset Management Inc. (PFAM) in the investment management contracts for certain prospectus-qualified mutual funds (known as the Pro-Index Funds) and in discretionary managed accounts managed by PFAM. The approval was granted by Vice-Chair Turner, who found that, on balance, the terms and conditions proposed at the time were not inconsistent with an adequate level of investor protection and were not prejudicial to the public interest.{2}

6. The approval was ordered subject to terms and conditions. The terms and conditions relevant to this OTBH are:

a. KCC (currently known as Smart) shall enter into a consulting agreement with a compliance consultant for at least two years from the date of the completion of the transactions;{3} and

b. Stuart McKinnon (McKinnon), the former owner of PFAM, may enter into a contractual relationship with KCC under which he would provide services to KCC that would not require McKinnon's registration under the [Securities] Act [Ontario] but, except with the prior written consent of the Commission, McKinnon could not be an officer, director or shareholder of KCC or play a similar role in KCC.{4}

7. At the time of the Commission Order, KCC (currently known as Smart) was registered as a portfolio manager and Kenneth White (White) was registered as KCC's advising representative, CCO and UDP. After the transactions to acquire the PFAM contracts, KCC became registered as an investment fund manager and a dealer in the category of exempt market dealer. White continued as the UDP and CCO and became President and a director of Smart.

8. Smart experienced significant staffing changes in 2015. White was terminated from Smart in April 2015 and Hopps became registered as UDP of Smart. Smart submitted an application for Pinto to be registered as its CCO and continued to retain a compliance consultant firm to advise it on compliance matters while the CCO application was under review by Staff.

9. Smart's sole advising representative (AR1) left the firm as at September 25, 2015 and Smart did not retain another advising representative until October 27, 2015 when the registration application for the final advising representative (AR3) was approved. Smart failed to maintain a registered advising representative from September 26, 2015 to October 26, 2015, inclusive (the Material Time).

10. During the Material Time, Smart permitted someone other than a registered advising representative to enter eleven trades to sell securities from one of the six Smart mutual funds. The trades were apparently executed to fund a unitholder's redemption request.

11. Smart also failed to file accurate and timely registration filings when hiring or terminating an individual registered with its firm. Smart failed to file the termination notice for AR1 in the prescribed time. Also, Smart submitted a registration application for an advising representative prior to entering into an employment contract and then failed to withdraw the application or file a timely notice of termination for this individual (AR2).

Law

12. Subsection 25(3) of the Securities Act (Ontario) (the Act) prohibits a person or company from engaging in the business of advising anyone with respect to investing in, buying or selling securities unless appropriately registered or exempt from the requirement to register:

25.

(3) Unless a person or company is exempt under Ontario securities law from the requirement to comply with this subsection, the person or company shall not engage in the business of, or hold himself, herself or itself out as engaging in the business of, advising anyone with respect to investing in, buying or selling securities unless the person or company,

(a) is registered in accordance with Ontario securities law as an adviser; [or]

(b) is a representative registered in accordance with Ontario securities law as an advising representative of a registered adviser and is acting on behalf of the registered adviser[.]

13. The Director may suspend the registration of a person or company or impose terms or conditions of registration pursuant to section 28 of the Act:

28. The Director may revoke or suspend the registration of a person or company or impose terms or conditions of registration at any time during the period of registration of the person or company if it appears to the Director,

(a) that the person or company is not suitable for registration or has failed to comply with Ontario securities law; or

(b) that the registration is otherwise objectionable.

14. Subparagraphs 2.1(2)(i) and (iii) of the Act state that, in pursuing the purposes of the Act, the Commission shall have regard to fundamental principles including the primary means for achieving the purposes of the Act, which include (i) requirements for timely, accurate and efficient disclosure of information and (ii) requirements for the maintenance of high standards of fitness and business conduct to ensure honest and responsible conduct of the market participants.

15. Section 11.1 of National Instrument 31-103 Registration Requirements, Exemptions and Ongoing Registrant Obligations (NI 31-103) sets out the requirements for a registered firm's compliance system:

11.1 A registered firm must establish, maintain and apply policies and procedures that establish a system of controls and supervision sufficient to

(a) provide reasonable assurance that the firm and each individual acting on its behalf complies with securities legislation, and

(b) manage the risks associated with its business in accordance with prudent business practices.

16. Section 11.3 of NI 31-103 includes requirements for a registered firm in respect of designating a CCO:

11.3

(1) A registered firm must designate an individual who is registered under securities legislation in the category of chief compliance officer to perform the functions described in section 5.2 [responsibilities of the chief compliance officer].

(2) A registered firm must not designate an individual to act as the firm's chief compliance officer unless the individual has satisfied the applicable conditions in Part 3 Registration requirements -- individuals and the individual is one of the following:

(a) an officer or partner of the registered firm;

(b) the sole proprietor of the registered firm.

(3) If an individual who is registered as a registered firm's chief compliance officer ceases to meet any of the conditions listed in subsection (2), the registered firm must designate another individual to act as its chief compliance officer.

17. The CCO and UDP of a registered firm must be permitted direct access to the firm's board of directors, pursuant to section 11.4 of NI 31-103:

11.4 A registered firm must permit its ultimate designated person and its chief compliance officer to directly access the firm's board of directors, or individuals acting in a similar capacity for the firm, at such times as the ultimate designated person or the chief compliance officer may consider necessary or advisable in view of his or her responsibilities.

18. The responsibilities of the UDP and the CCO of a registered firm are set out in sections 5.1 and 5.2 of NI 31-103, respectively:

5.1 The ultimate designated person of a registered firm must do all of the following:

(a) supervise the activities of the firm that are directed towards ensuring compliance with securities legislation by the firm and each individual acting on the firm's behalf;

(b) promote compliance by the firm, and individuals acting on its behalf, with securities legislation.

5.2 The chief compliance officer of a registered firm must do all of the following:

(a) establish and maintain policies and procedures for assessing compliance by the firm, and individuals acting on its behalf, with securities legislation;

(b) monitor and assess compliance by the firm, and individuals acting on its behalf, with securities legislation;

(c) report to the ultimate designated person of the firm as soon as possible if the chief compliance officer becomes aware of any circumstances indicating that the firm, or any individual acting on its behalf, may be in non-compliance with securities legislation and any of the following apply:

(i) the non-compliance creates, in the opinion of a reasonable person, a risk of harm to a client;

(ii) the non-compliance creates, in the opinion of a reasonable person, a risk of harm to the capital markets;

(iii) the non-compliance is part of a pattern of non-compliance;

(d) submit an annual report to the firm's board of directors, or individuals acting in a similar capacity for the firm, for the purpose of assessing compliance by the firm, and individuals acting on its behalf, with securities legislation.

Reasons for Decision

19. My decision is based on materials provided before, during and after two in-person meetings (February 11, 2016 and March 31, 2016) and the submissions of Michael Denyszyn (Senior Legal Counsel, Compliance and Registrant Regulation), which included an affidavit of Pamela Woodall (Woodall) (Corporate Registration Officer, Compliance and Registrant Regulation), and submissions of Alistair Crawley (Crawley) Counsel for Smart and Hopps.

20. By letter dated February 9, 2016, Crawley submitted that Smart and Hopps would not be challenging the factual allegations in Staff's recommendation letter dated December 9, 2015 or the evidence in Woodall's affidavit. Furthermore, at the in-person meeting on February 11, 2016, Crawley's opening statement provided that "[the proposed reorganization], in our submission, is a substantive reaction and acceptance of responsibility for the situation that occurred".{5}

21. Based on the evidence presented, I find that Smart breached subsection 25(3) of the Act when it engaged in advising activity during the Material Time without having maintained an appropriately registered advising representative.

22. The circumstances relating to the breach of subsection 25(3) include the facts that Smart failed to file accurate and timely registration information through the National Registration Database (NRD). Smart filed the notice of termination for AR1 later than the required 10 days after the cessation date. Also, Smart entered a registration application for AR2 before entering into an employment contract. An offer for employment was made but AR2 did not accept the offer. Smart failed to withdraw AR2's application at the time the offer was declined. Instead, Smart filed a notice of termination stating the reason for termination was "resigned voluntarily".

23. Section 4.2 of National Instrument 33-109 Registration Information requires a registered firm to notify the regulator if an individual, whose registration the firm sponsors, ceases to have authority to act on behalf of the firm. AR2 did not have the authority to act on behalf of Smart because an employment contract was never executed. Therefore, Smart filed a notice of termination that contained false information.

24. When reviewing the registration information on its face, it appears that Smart maintained an advising representative during the Material Time. However, upon examination of each situation, it is evident that Smart failed to maintain an appropriately registered advising representative during the Material Time.

25. The failure to file accurate and timely registration information obscured the fact that Smart did not have a registered advising representative during the Material Time. Filing false notices and registration information on NRD does not demonstrate high standards of fitness and business conduct and is not honest and responsible conduct.

26. At the first in-person meeting, Smart and Hopps requested that the Director and Staff consider a reorganization plan that included experienced and qualified personnel being registered as the UDP and the CCO of Smart. Further, Hopps would remain as chairman and secretary of the board of directors, and through 238 Inc., he would continue to be the majority shareholder of Smart. The experienced and professional executives joining Smart were proposed to obtain equity ownership in the firm.

27. Considering that a registered advising representative, AR3, had been hired months before the first in-person meeting and there was no evidence that the mutual fund assets or managed account assets were at risk of imminent harm, I determined it was reasonable under the circumstances to consider the reorganization plan.

28. In the interim, I requested a transition plan for how Hopps would supervise the activities of the firm while reserving judgement on Staff's recommendation to suspend Smart's registrations as investment fund manager, portfolio manager and exempt market dealer, and Hopps's registration as UDP.

29. Additional documents were requested to assist in making a determination regarding Staff's recommendation. AR3 was requested to conduct an analysis of the trading in all of the Smart mutual funds and managed accounts to determine whether there were any trades made by unregistered persons, other than the eleven trades that occurred in one mutual fund during the Material Time. Also requested were details of how Hopps would execute his responsibilities as UDP.

30. AR3's report confirmed that the eleven trades that occurred during the Material Time were the only trades entered by an unregistered person in the mutual funds or managed accounts during the time that Smart failed to maintain an appropriately-registered advising representative. Also, the report stated that "consistent with [the funds'] investment objectives[...], the holdings generally mimicked the indexes".{6}

31. When the Commission consented to Hopps purchasing shares of KCC (currently known as Smart), Hopps was entering into the transaction strictly as an investment. He had no experience owning or operating a registered firm.

32. However, situations change and Hopps was required to take on the role and responsibilities of UDP. There are no specific proficiency requirements for a UDP other than the proficiency requirements in section 3.4 of NI 31-103 that a person have the education, training and experience that a reasonable person would consider necessary to perform the activity competently. Once Hopps became registered as the UDP of Smart, he became legally obligated to comply with the responsibilities to supervise the activities of Smart. Those responsibilities include ensuring compliance with securities legislation and promoting compliance within the firm as set out in section 5.1 of NI 31-103.

33. During the first in-person meeting, it was impressed upon Hopps that the UDP of a registered firm serves an important role and that the specified responsibilities must be fulfilled. Also, in order to effectively oversee the business of a registered firm and set an appropriate tone at the top, prudent business practice includes the UDP being physically present in the office. This discussion was necessary since Hopps stated that he was in the office very infrequently and that he relied upon others to bring issues to his attention. Hopps acknowledged his failing as UDP and accepted responsibility for the issues that occurred at Smart.

34. In the transition plan, Hopps was requested to provide specific details of how he would carry-out the UDP responsibilities and how often he would be physically present in Smart's offices. This information was requested to be provided within two weeks after the first in-person meeting.

35. The transition plan was submitted on March 16, 2016, almost 5 weeks after the first in-person meeting. Hopps provided that he would carry-out the UDP responsibilities by reviewing various reports, meeting with staff members, some weekly, others less frequently and encouraging staff to contact him if they had concerns or issues with compliance. It was not clear if the meetings were intended to be in-person or by other means.

36. At the second in-person meeting, which was seven weeks after the first, Hopps stated that he was only physically present in the office one day per week during the seven-week period. I have put weight on this fact because through the transition plan he was provided with an opportunity to demonstrate commitment to making real change at Smart. Instead, the transition plan and his actions during this seven-week period demonstrates a lack of commitment to take action to immediately improve the operations of Smart and his lack of intention to comply with Section 5.1 of NI 31-103.

37. Considering the fact that the regulatory breaches occurred while Hopps was registered as UDP and his demonstrated lack of understanding and appreciation for the responsibilities of a UDP, I have concluded that Hopps failed to discharge his duties as UDP. If Hopps remained registered as UDP, I would have suspended his registration and permanently prohibited him from registering as UDP at any point in the future.

38. As part of the transition plan, Smart put forward a candidate to replace Hopps as UDP. Staff reviewed the application and the candidate has demonstrated that he understands and accepts the regulatory responsibilities required of a UDP. Since it is in the interest of the unitholders, managed account clients and the public to have an effective UDP, Staff has approved the registration of the new UDP, effective April 12, 2016, without prejudice to Staff's recommended regulatory action. Hopps was permitted to surrender his UDP registration.

39. Section 11.3 of NI 31-103 requires each registered firm to designate an individual as the CCO. After the departure of White, Smart submitted an application for Pinto to be designated as its CCO. Staff recommended that Pinto's application be refused. The focus during this OTBH has been on Hopps and Smart and not specifically on Pinto's registration application for CCO. Pinto did not attend the meetings with the Director during this OTBH and Smart stated that it would withdraw her application since it agreed that she is not suitable for the CCO role. Since my decision is to suspend the registrations of Smart, I do not find it necessary to make a decision on Pinto's application. However, I do believe there was sufficient information to support Staff's recommendation to refuse her registration. Also, the fact that Smart put forward an application for a CCO that is not suitable further demonstrates that Hopps and Smart do not comprehend the regulatory requirements and that Smart is lacking an effective compliance system.

40. Smart has made several attempts to hire an experienced CCO, but has not been successful. Staff have dutifully reviewed each of the CCO candidates and have found them to be lacking either the proficiency or the experience required of a CCO for the full scope of Smart's business activities.

41. At the second-in person meeting, Hopps stated that he would hire a recruiting firm to assist with the hiring of a qualified CCO. However, this effort has come too late in the process. It was originally estimated that under the best case scenario, Smart could have the reorganization plan executed within 2 to 3 months of the first in-person meeting. As of the date of decision, it has been almost 3 months from the first in-person meeting and to date Smart has not informed Staff that a qualified CCO candidate is available to be registered.

42. The second element of a registered firm's compliance system, as set out in paragraph 11.1(b) of NI 31-103, is to manage risks associated with the firm's business in accordance with prudent business practices. Prudent business practices include establishing an appropriate governance structure for the firm. The board of directors is a fundamental component of a firm's governance structure.

43. Also, Paragraph 5.2(d) of NI 31-103 requires the CCO to submit an annual report to the firm's board of directors for the purpose of assessing compliance by the firm, and the individuals acting on its behalf, with securities legislation. Further, section 11.4 of NI 31-103 requires that the UDP and CCO have access to the board when they believe it is necessary to fulfill their responsibilities.

44. Through these provisions, securities legislation recognizes the important role the board of directors fulfills in a firm's governance structure.

45. Crawley stated that through the reorganization plan Hopps would be returned to the role of shareholder and would not participate in the day-to-day operations of Smart in an effort to demonstrate that the regulatory breaches that occurred while he was UDP would not occur in the future. However, I do not agree with this proposition because the reorganization plan as presented shows that Hopps will remain as chairman of the board and secretary in addition to being the majority shareholder of Smart.

46. Smart has a small board of directors that consists of three members (Hopps and 2 others). None of the directors can be considered independent. As chairman, Hopps will realistically continue to have great influence over how Smart manages the risks associated with its business. Also, as majority shareholder he can impact the financial resources available to the firm. Hopps has injected capital into the firm to maintain working capital above the regulatory requirements, but a substantial investment will likely be required to hire a qualified CCO and to remediate Smart's ineffective compliance systems. At no point during this OTBH has Hopps put forward a projected budget for implementing an effective compliance system.

47. The regulatory expectation is that business risks are managed in accordance with prudent business practices. Considering the totality of the regulatory issues at Smart, how Smart and Hopps have responded to the regulatory issues and Hopps' demonstrated lack of understanding of regulatory obligations while he was UDP, I do not have confidence in his ability as chairman of the board to examine and consider systemic, structural and governance issues in order to evaluate and determine an appropriate regulatory response to compliance issues in the future.

48. As the Commission stated in Re Mithras Management Ltd.:

We are not here to punish past conduct; that is the role of the courts...We are here to restrain, as best we can, future conduct that is likely to be prejudicial to the public interest in having capital markets that are both fair and efficient. In so doing we must, of necessity, look to past conduct as a guide to what we believe a person's future conduct might reasonably be expected to be; we are not prescient, after all.{7}

49. Therefore, as Director, I reject the reorganization plan, due to the fact that Hopps will remain as chairman of the board of directors and majority shareholder. In light of our serious concerns about the state of compliance at Smart and based on the how he has responded to the regulatory issues during this process, I do not foresee a change in the future.

50. It is established that registration is a privilege not a right.{8} Considering the fact that Smart has breached Ontario securities law, has failed to establish an effective compliance system, has not maintained high standards of fitness and business conduct to ensure honest and responsible conduct and the reorganization plan is rejected, I am left with the decision of whether terms and conditions would be sufficient to address the regulatory non-compliance at Smart or whether it is appropriate to suspend the registrations of the firm.

51. Smart is already subject to terms and conditions from the Commission Order requiring it to engage a compliance consultant to advise on compliance matters. Since the breaches of securities law occurred while the compliance consultant was engaged and there is evidence that the recommendation of the compliance consultant was not followed during the Material Time, it does not seem prudent or in the public interest to layer on additional terms and conditions. Additionally, a compliance consultant is not a substitute for a proficient and experienced CCO.

52. Further it is established that terms and conditions should not be used to shore up an objectionable registrant.{9} In Re Jaynes the Director stated that "[w]hile terms and conditions restricting registration may be appropriate in a wide variety of circumstances, they should not be used to 'shore up' a fundamentally objectionable registration".{10}

53. Without an effective compliance system, a proficient and experienced CCO and a sound governance structure, the continuation of Smart's registrations is fundamentally objectionable. I do not believe that terms and conditions are appropriate or would be effective under these circumstances, so my decision is to suspend Smart's registrations.

54. The impact to the unitholders and managed account clients weighed heavily on my decision to suspend Smart's registrations. In the end, I am guided by one of the purposes of the Act, which is to provide protection to investors from unfair, improper or fraudulent practices.{11} While there are no allegations of fraud in this matter, the regulatory requirements for an effective compliance system are in place to protect investors. When a firm's compliance system and governance structure is fundamentally flawed, as is the case with Smart, investors' interests are not protected. Also, the unitholders and managed account clients are entrusting their financial assets and paying fees to Smart. From their perspective, it is reasonable to expect that the firm with which they have entrusted their assets is maintaining high standards of fitness and business conduct to ensure honest and responsible conduct.

55. Since Smart is the investment fund manager for prospectus qualified mutual funds, there is a procedure required to notify unitholders and commence the winding-up process. Therefore, the suspension will commence 70 calendar days after the date of this decision. During this 70 calendar day period, Smart shall not accept new unitholders or additional assets from current unitholders in the mutual funds or open managed accounts for new or existing clients or accept additional assets from clients. Redemption requests from the unitholders shall be managed through the winding-up process.

56. One final point, as stated in paragraph 6 above, the Commission Order provided that McKinnon was not to take on the role of an officer, director or shareholder of KCC (currently known as Smart), or to play a similar role in KCC, without prior written consent of the Commission. As disclosed throughout this OTBH, McKinnon has been providing services to Smart and Hopps, which gives me concern as to whether McKinnon may be acting in a manner which is inconsistent with the intentions of the Commission Order. Some of the activity included McKinnon negotiating employment contracts on behalf of Smart, discussing compliance issues with the compliance consultant retained by Smart and fulfilling a business and product development role at Smart. Whether this activity is tantamount to the role of an officer of Smart is a question for review by the Commission.

Debra Foubert, J.D.
Director, Compliance and Registrant Regulation Branch
Ontario Securities Commission

May 2, 2016

{1} Re Kingship Capital Corporation et al. (2014), 37 OSCB 6923.

{2} Ibid at 6924.

{3} Ibid.

{4} Ibid.

{5} Transcript of OTBH dated February 11, 2016 at 16:1-3.

{6} Exhibit 3, Tab E, Report of [AR3] dated March 15, 2016 at 3.

{7} (1990), 13 OSCB 1600 at 1610-1611.

{8} Re Istanbul (2008), 31 OSCB 3799 at para 60.

{9} (2000), 23 OSCB 1543.

{10} Ibid at 1548.

{11} Section 1.1 of the Act.

 

Addendum -- Joint Recommendation by Staff and Smart Investments Ltd. to Debra Foubert in her Capacity as Director

Staff (Staff) of the Ontario Securities Commission (OSC), Smart Investments Ltd. (Smart) and David Hopps (Hopps) jointly recommend that in light of your decision in the capacity of Director dated May 2, 2016 (the Director's Decision), and in light of subsequent material changes to the business of Smart as outlined herein, the suspensions imposed on Smart in the Director's Decision should be modified as follows:

(i) Smart will notify the unitholders of its prospectus-qualified mutual funds (the Funds) on July 6, 2016 that the Funds will be voluntarily wound up with the proceeds returned to unitholders or, if held in a registered account, the proceeds will be transferred to another institution in accordance with the unitholder's instructions, and the suspension of Smart's investment fund manager registration will be deferred until September 6, 2016, at which point Smart's investment fund manager registration will be suspended for the reasons set out in the Director's Decision.

(ii) Because a corporation controlled by Loren Greenspoon has agreed to acquire 100% of the voting securities of Smart from Hopps, and because Thomas Nicolle has obtained registration in the category of chief compliance officer at Smart, the Director's Decision will be modified so as not to suspend Smart's registrations as an adviser in the category of portfolio manager or as a dealer in the category of exempt market dealer.

(iii) If the Director accepts this joint recommendation, Smart and Hopps will immediately withdraw their application dated June 1, 2016 for a hearing and review of the Director's Decision.

(iv) If the Director accepts this joint recommendation, Smart and Hopps agree to waive all rights to a review of this matter.

(v) If the Director accepts this joint recommendation, none of the parties will make any public statement that is inconsistent with this joint recommendation.

(vi) If the Director does not accept this joint recommendation, all discussions and negotiations between Staff, Smart and Hopps in relation to this matter, and the joint recommendation itself, shall be without prejudice to the parties.

Respectfully jointly submitted by,

Elizabeth A. King
"July 4, 2016"
Deputy Director, Compliance
Date

and Registrant Regulation, on behalf of Staff of the Ontario Securities Commission

Alistair Crawley
"July 4, 2016"
Alistair Crawley, Crawley MacKewn Brush LLP, on behalf of Smart Investments Ltd. and David Hopps
Date

In my capacity as Director, I hereby accept the joint recommendation.

Debra Foubert
"July 4, 2016"
Debra Foubert, Director, Compliance and Registrant Regulation
Date

 

Chapter 4 -- Cease Trading Orders

Temporary, Permanent & Rescinding Issuer Cease Trading Orders

Company Name

Date of Temporary Order

Date of Hearing

Date of Permanent Order

Date of Lapse/Revoke

 

__________

__________

__________

__________

__________

THERE ARE NO ITEMS TO REPORT THIS WEEK.

Failure to File Cease Trade Orders

Company Name

Date of Order

Date of Revocation

 

Caspian Energy Inc.

10 May 2016

30 June 2016